The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating

"Whereas the documentary Ice on Fire focused on macro-level environmental changes caused by climate change, Bailey’s narrative focused on the life of a tiny mollusk and the profound lessons gleaned about our relationship to the natural world and a sobering view of our place in evolutionary history in the Anthropocene age..." [read more below]

Don't miss this multi-award-winning short film based on the memoir of author/filmmaker Elisabeth Tova Bailey, with audience Q&A

Just one week left until SFGFF's Valentine's event, an encore screening of the 2019 hit shorts program Contemplating Critters. Celebrate the beauty of our world's small marvels with us this February. Each year around this time, we encourage our audiences to reassess societal norms around consumption (think: pink balloons & unsustainable chocolates) and instead, show some love for the planet. Join us!

9th St. Independent Film Center  ::  Wednesday, Feb 12  

6pm  ::  Wine & Cheese Reception

7-9pm ::  Contemplating Critters Program

Tickets & Full Program Details

This lineup of stunning award-winning films examines how we interact with each other and the natural world around us. We form intricate bonds with long-lasting impact, and by supporting each other are able to survive and remain strong. Come be a part of our eco-savvy, movie-loving community. Continue reading one audience member's lovely and thoughtful reflection on The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating below. 

Ice on Fire screening at the San Francisco Public Library, 1/28/20

"When the executive director of the SF Green Festival announced on Tuesday the upcoming screening of the short film, "The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating," it elicited chuckles from the audience. Compared to the weighty title of the film we came to see, Ice on Fire, about the upcoming climate apocalypse, a snail film sounded quaint but not important or awe-inspiring, a view I shared before reading Bailey’s book. However, half-way through part one,  I was quickly absorbed in snail watching and the “unfolding mystery of the life a snail led.” Whereas the documentary Ice on Fire focused on macro-level environmental changes caused by climate change, Bailey’s narrative focused on the life of a tiny mollusk and the profound lessons gleaned about our relationship to the natural world and a sobering view of our place in evolutionary history in the Anthropocene age. At a concert last night, Laurie Anderson led the audience in a group scream in response to the Brazilain and Australian fires and other climate catastrophes. With snails still in my head, I wondered, since a snail can’t hear, could it sense the vibrations of our outrage? After this week's climate immersive multi-media experiences, what sticks most with me, the literal and literary "stickiness" of a story, is imagining the sound a wild snail makes while chewing and all the genetic traits ensconced in the mind and shell of that snail."

Maureen O'Kicki
MA Science Writing
Johns Hopkins University

Buy My Tickets